Japanese Manner and Custom

Updated

Japanese Manner

Japanese Manner

Etiquette is very important in Japan. The way we speak, the way we refer to others, and just in general, the way we act, all reflect the Japanese way of life.

You might be aware of some of the traditional Japanese manners and customs such as taking your shoes off before entering a home or bowing as a greeting but do you really know what to do with the shoes after you take them off or how deep you should be bowing?

Before traveling, it would be a good idea to take a look at some of the manners and customs the Japanese follow.

Keigo

Keigo

Respect and politeness in Japanese Language

Japanese Names

Japanese Names

In Japan, people refer each other by their last name followed by their first name.

Japanese Name Titles

Japanese Name Titles

The last name is used with the appropriate title following the name

Bowing

Bowing

Greeting, Expressing gratitude, Apologizing and shows respect

Japanese Customs

Japanese Customs

Japan is a unique country with many interesting customs. Whether it be customs during the holidays like children receiving otoshidama or envelopes with allowances or people waiting in lines to buy fukubukuro or lucky bags with a bunch of goodies on New Years, Japan has many unique customs.

Some customs will be helpful to know when traveling. For example, it is not customary to tip in Japan in restaurants or hotels or anywhere. Or you might have finished a quick lunch and you're looking for a trash can only to find three different boxes. The Japanese take their recycling and trash sorting very seriously. You will need to know which trash belongs in which bin depending on whether it is burnable or not burnable trash.

Otoshidama

Otoshidama

New Years Allowance

Hand Towel (Oshibori)

Hand Towel (Oshibori)

Wet hot or cold towel, presented to customers before a meal

Randoseru

Randoseru

Japanese Backpacks

Fukubukuro

Fukubukuro

Lucky Bags with goodies sold during the New Years

Tipping in Japan

Tipping in Japan

In Japan, tipping is not mandatory, nor is it customary

Recycling in Japan

Recycling in Japan

Take the correct type of trash out on the correct day

Tooth Fairy in Japan

Tooth Fairy in Japan

When children lose a baby-tooth in Japan, the custom is to throw the tooth either straight up or straight down.

Chopsticks

Chopsticks

Chopsticks are the Japanese equivalent to a Fork and Spoon when eating.

Yokai & Superstitions

Yokai are Japanese-spirits and demons in Japanese folk-tales. The Yokai are used in many stories through out Japan's history, still with popularity today in the media. Yokai are supernatural beings that posses incredible powers, and are sometimes revered as gods. While there are differences depending on the region you visit, Yokai play a role in Japan's mythology, and the stories have entertained generations for hundreds of years.

Yatagarasu

Yatagarasu

Yatagarasu is a three-legged crow in Japanese mythology.

Tengu

Tengu

Tengu are legendary creatures found in Japanese folk stories

Kappa

Kappa

Kappa are a yokai spirit found in traditional Japanese mythology.

Shisa

Shisa

Okinawa's mythical Lion-Dogs protect homes and keep bad luck away.

Others

Pachinko

Pachinko

Combination of pinball and slot machines in Japan

White Surgical Masks

White Surgical Masks

Considerate of Others? Preventing Getting Sick?

Tanuki

Tanuki

Japanese Raccoon Dogs

Kabutomushi (Japanese rhinoceros beetle)

Kabutomushi (Japanese rhinoceros beetle)

Japanese Rhinoceros Beetles

Taiko Show

Taiko Show

Taiko are a broad range of Japanese drums used throughout Japan's history.

Happi Coats

Happi Coats

A happi is a traditional Japanese robe with the family crest or mon printed on the back.

Jizo Statues

Jizo Statues

When you travel Japan, you would see many Jizo-statue along the road, in temples, anywhere in Japan

Family Crest

Family Crest

Mon, or Kamon, are Japanese emblems used to identify an individual or family.

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